The 4 Disciplines of Execution

Strategies for Implementing
Change and Innovation

The 4 Disciplines of Execution by Chris McChesney, Sean Covey, and Jim Huling specifically outlines several disciplines, rules, and strategies that can bring about significant, successful, and innovative change in an organization. The success stories in the book are mainly centered around businesses. However, the plans set forth in the book can be applied in an education setting as well, with both staff and students. 

In this post I will continue with the goals addressed in my previous post, Libraries as Learning Hubs – Harnessing Vital Behaviors & the 6 Sources of Influence. The goal of transforming all of our district libraries from the traditional model to learning hubs is directly related to the STREAM Camp in my Innovation Plan. STREAM Camp is a fun special event that models some goals for our libraries, and makes the library a fun learning destination.


The 4 Disciplines outlined in the book are:

1. Focus on the Wildly Important 

  • No more the 1 to 3 WIGs per person at the same time
  • Battles have to win the war.
  • You can veto, but don’t dictate
  • A WIG must have a finish line

2. Act on Lead Measures

3. Keep a Compelling Scoreboard 

4. Create a Cadence of Accountability – Short Wig Sessions

  • Account: Report on Commitments
  • Review the Scoreboard: Learn from Success and Failures
  • Plan: Clear the path and make new commitments

My plans for transforming libraries to learning hubs include:

WIG: Transform all of our district libraries from the traditional model to bustling learning hubs that are the heart of the school.

LEAD Measures: 

  • Example: At least 20% of library collection is comprised of digital materials
  • Example: Lessons or activities per week associated with STEM topics, goal is 3

LAG Measures: 

  • Number of activities shared – goal is 200 by the end of the school year
  • Total Budget spent on maker space supplies & digital tools throughout the school year, goal is $6 per student per year, aligned with Texas State Library Standards.

Compelling Scorecard:

The team can enter the percent of digital tools they have or the number of activities they have hosted or shared into an online form. The results can be shared in a bar graph format. 


In Section 2, the Stages of Change are outlined for installing the 4DX with a team.

Stage 1 Getting Clear

Stage 2 Launch

Stage 3 Adoption

Stage 4 Optimization

Stage 5 Building Habits


The 4DX method can be a companion set of strategies to the Influencer sources of influence and vital behaviors. While they both address setting and measuring goals, they each have their own beneficial qualities. 4DX has a very specific structure that must be supported by the leader, which eventually transforms to habitual excellence after monitoring progress and making shifts. The Influencer model takes into account all of the various elements that can support or hinder change, progress and innovation. I plan to use both models while supporting our libraries continue to develop innovative practices.

The 2nd Edition: Revised and Updated version of The 4 Disciplines of Execution offers additional content and includes utilizing technology for compelling executive scoreboards.

The 2nd Edition: Revised and Updated version of The 4 Disciplines of Execution offers additional content and includes utilizing technology for compelling executive scoreboards.

References:

Covey, S., McChesney, C., & Huling, J. (2012). 4 disciplines of execution: Achieving your wildly important goals. S.l.: Simon & Schuster.

Grenny, J., & Patterson, K. (2013). Influencer: the power to change anything. McGraw-Hill Professional.

School library Programs: Standards and guidelines for Texas. (2019, August 13). Retrieved May 06, 2021, from https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ldn/schoollibrarystandards

One Comment on “The 4 Disciplines of Execution

  1. Pingback: Crucial Conversations and Steps to Becoming a Self-Differentiated Leader with Purpose | Holly D. Landez ePortfolio

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